Mastering New Technologies Takes Time

Things move fast in the IT industry. Half of the technologies I use today didn't exist ten years ago. There's a constant push to switch to new technologies.  But when it comes to technologies, I'm kind of conservative. I like proven technologies. The thing that makes me conservative is that mastering a technology takes a … Continue reading Mastering New Technologies Takes Time

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The Age of Agile

This book is about agile management as a way to conduct  business -- not just software development. In the first chapters, the author presents agile management by characterizing it with three "laws": the law of the customer, the law of the small teams, and the law of the network. Roughly, I would sum them up … Continue reading The Age of Agile

Stuff Matters

Stuff Matters is a very nice little book about the materials that surround us. Organized in ten chapter, each tracing the history of a class of material (metal, paper, glass, plastics, chocolate, gels, graphene, concrete, ceramics, biomaterial), we get to better appreciate how much tinkering and research took place over centuries to discover all these … Continue reading Stuff Matters

No More QA

Companies have traditionally organized software-related activites in three silos: Dev, Test/QA, Operations. The QA effort is realized after a long phase of development resulting in bug spikes and difficulties to plan the work for the development teams during this time. When companies were engineering software "piecewise" this was the only way. Only when all pieces … Continue reading No More QA

Do You Need an Architect?

Architects do typically three things: they own, they coordinate, and they mentor. As an owner, the architect maintains the integrity of the system at a high level. He designs the foundations, identifies tradeoffs, decides on essential changes. As a coordinator, the architect facilitates work and optimizes the exchange of information. He connects people, gather information, … Continue reading Do You Need an Architect?

Platforms and Innovation

I started my career writing flash applications. Then I moved to Java. Both are middleware technologies that abstract the underlying operating system and enable cross-platform interoperability. I've actually never wrote a professional application that relied directly on a specific operating system. This was fine to me. "Write once, run everywhere" was great for productivity. For … Continue reading Platforms and Innovation