Peak Productivity

The goal of pretty much any framework/plattform that you use — from a PaaS offering to application server and everything in between — is to make you more productive by taking care of some technical complexity for you. They speed up development so that you can ship faster. And it’s true that you can ship faster: You can now, with current technologies, build an internet-scale … Continue reading Peak Productivity

Some of My Favorite Articles

Sometimes, I read an article, and some idea deeply resonates with me and makes a long lasting impression. It changes the way I approach some topic. Fred Brooks’ essay “no silver bullet” was one of the very first article I read that had this effect. The concepts of esssential and accidental complexity are very powerfull, deeply resonate with me, and shaped the way I see … Continue reading Some of My Favorite Articles

Team Structures

A main responsibility of management is to make sure that teams function well. This implies defining the adequate organisational structures and finding adequate people. The Boss Team Sometimes, the structure is easy. There’s a boss and there are employees. The boss decides how the team should function, what should be done, who should do it, and is finally the one evaluating the employees according to … Continue reading Team Structures

Drive

The key message of “Drive“, from Daniel H. Pink, is that people are best engaged in a task when they understand the purpose of the job, they can develop the necessary mastery to realise the job, and they have sufficient autonomy to direct things their way. That’s a very simple framework — purpose, mastery, autonomy — and I very much like it. The problem with … Continue reading Drive

Mastering New Technologies Takes Time

Things move fast in the IT industry. Half of the technologies I use today didn’t exist ten years ago. There’s a constant push to switch to new technologies.  But when it comes to technologies, I’m kind of conservative. I like proven technologies. The thing that makes me conservative is that mastering a technology takes a lot longer that we think. Most advocates of new technologies … Continue reading Mastering New Technologies Takes Time

Stuff Matters

Stuff Matters is a very nice little book about the materials that surround us. Organized in ten chapter, each tracing the history of a class of material (metal, paper, glass, plastics, chocolate, gels, graphene, concrete, ceramics, biomaterial), we get to better appreciate how much tinkering and research took place over centuries to discover all these materials and their properties. Most materials in the book are … Continue reading Stuff Matters

No More QA

Companies have traditionally organized software-related activites in three silos: Dev, Test/QA, Operations. The QA effort is realized after a long phase of development resulting in bug spikes and difficulties to plan the work for the development teams during this time. When companies were engineering software “piecewise” this was the only way. Only when all pieces were finished could you integrate them and test features end-to-end. … Continue reading No More QA

Autonomy and Microservices

Discussions about monolith vs microservice are hotter than ever. Usually, a monolith is synonym for “big ball of mud” in these discussions. It of course needn’t be so. A modular monolith is perfectly possible. Also, microservices isn’t an entirely new idea either. As some says, it’s SOA done right. The usual argument in favor of microservices is that autonomy is a good thing: teams can … Continue reading Autonomy and Microservices